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Report: Building Back Better with a Bold Green Recovery

Collating seven weeks of white papers, new report maps out how Canada can shift from pandemic to prosperity

One of the things we have seen over the last few months is we do have the capability to come together and do really challenging things. We never would have imagined the federal government could have turned on a dime to deliver cheques to 8 million people at the pace that we did. It shows that when faced with a challenge we can get to solutions, even complex solutions. That should give us insights into how we can move forward on other complex challenges, and there is probably not a more complex challenge than the climate crisis we are facing as a planet.

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Building Back Better: A roadmap to the Canada we want

We can create quality jobs and own part of the low-carbon podium if we invest now with boldness and creativity

For all the pain and suffering COVID-19 has inflicted and will inflict before it subsides, it has also created a historic opportunity to pivot toward a green economy. The “pandemic pause” has created a window to stop and think about where we want to go when this is over. This seven-part Corporate Knights series of articles and online roundtables has explored how to make the coming economic recovery one that leapfrogs us forward in the quest for a calmer, cooler climate and peace with nature.

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Building Back Better with a Natural Resource and EV Innovation Fund

Drawing inspiration from birth of oil sands can net resource-rich provinces a $125 billion/year share of zero-carbon market

It was almost 50 years ago that Alberta decided to invest in the innovative technologies that would transform the oil sands into an economically viable global-scale resource – and into a Canadian success story. In the 1970s, Alberta Premier Peter Lougheed established the Alberta Oil Sands Technology and Research Authority (AOSTRA), which spent $1.4 billion (in today’s dollars) developing the breakthrough technology of in situ oil sands extraction. This helped unlock more than $313 billion of investments into the oil sands, which at their peak employed 400,000 people directly or indirectly and provided $8 billion in annual revenue to governments.

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