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Responsible investing columnist

Fund face-off: Are your investments LGBTQ-friendly?

There are a lot of socially responsible ETFs on the market now, including two with opposing takes on LGBTQ+ issues

Pride Month may be coming to a close, but investors can keep the spirit alive year-round by considering the impact of their investments on LGBTQ+ issues. Consumers vote with their dollars, and so can investors.

Instead of looking at individual company stocks this week, we’re comparing two exchange-traded funds (ETFs). ETFs are like mutual funds in that they are a bundle of companies wrapped up in a fund. However, they trade directly on the stock exchange, instead of through a sales network, which makes them less expensive than mutual funds. There are a lot of socially responsible ETFs on the market right now, including two with opposing takes on LGBTQ+ issues.

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Tim Nash’s sustainable stock showdown pulls plug on GE

With a growing number of investors turning out the lights on General Electric, does Schneider Electric have brighter ideas?

It’s been a rough ride for the General Electric Company. Once considered one of the largest and most stable companies in the world, the American conglomerate has now fallen from grace losing almost two-thirds of its value since 2016, thanks in large part to a bet on fossil fuels gone wrong. Investors are understandably frustrated by GE’s poor performance and are likely looking for an alternative. Enter this week’s Sustainable Stock Showdown.

The General Electric Company (GE:NYSE) was founded in 1892 by American icons including Thomas Edison and J. P. Morgan in upstate New York. It was initially famous for producing light bulbs and rapidly expanded into home appliances, aviation and power generation. The company’s market value peaked just shy of $600 billion in 2000 but has steadily declined to less than $100 billion today.

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Green investments top $10 trillion worldwide

Our latest report details over $10 trillion in investments in everything from high-tech buildings to salt water-loving foods

So often when you read policy about the transition to a low-carbon economy like the Green New Deal, it’s presented as some ideal future state. Although we still have a long way to go, a new report I co-authored reveals the green economy is already here and now, to the tune of $10 trillion over the last decade.

Since 2009, I’ve worked with Ethical Markets Media to publish the annual Green Transition Scoreboard. Our latest report details more than $10 trillion of private investments in renewable energy, energy efficiency, green construction, corporate green R&D and life systems over the last ten years.

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Tim Nash’s sustainable stock showdown: Kimberly-Clark vs. Cascades

If you don't want to blow your nose (or your investments) on the Boreal forest, what are your options?

They say there are only two sure things in life: death and taxes. But if there’s another thing we all share in common, it’s our reliance on, well, disposable paper products. This week we look at two companies in this sector: Kimberly-Clark (KMB.NYSE) and Cascades (CAS.TO).

Kimberly-Clark is an American consumer products company that makes personal care products like diapers, tissues, and yes, toilet paper. Some of its brands include Huggies, Kleenex, Kotex and Cottonelle. I was quite skeptical of Kimberly-Clark going into my research. The forestry sector, in general, has a chequered past with impacts on biodiversity loss, climate change, and indigenous rights.  As far back as 2005, Greenpeace vocally accused Kleenex of blowing our noses on the Boreal forest.

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Tim Nash’s sustainable stock showdown on ditching Exxon for greener oil

As Exxon shareholders turning up heat over climate risks, one oil company is proving itself as renewables powerhouse

As a sustainable investment advisor, I’ve had the uncomfortable job of sitting with climate activist clients as we open up their portfolio to find Exxon shares front and centre. Exxon Mobil Corporation (XOM) is one of the biggest companies in the world and so it tends to have a prominent place in the top ten holdings of most standard funds.  It’s a bitter pill to swallow for the climate conscious, since Exxon has one of the largest carbon footprints on the planet.

Environmental advocates have had good reason to scorn Exxon at least as far back as 1989, when the Exxon Valdez spilled roughly 11 million gallons of oil into Alaska’s Prince William Sound. More recently, a 2015 investigative report from Inside Climate News revealed that Exxon scientists knew about the climate impacts of fossil fuel use back in the 1980s and undertook a massive lobbying and advertising campaign to sow seeds of doubt and uncertainty around the science of climate change.

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